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 Alain Coche-Bizouard is a small estate (9 ha) based in Meursault that has been in operation since 1940. The wines are made by Fabien Coche, the son of Alain. I picked this bottle up at the domaine during a visit in July of 2007. The estate only owns a tiny piece in the lower portion of Charmes (.3 ha.), but the vines are 70+ years old. Very pretty and delicate on the nose, the wine is well balanced in the mouth. The finish is mineral and intense, presumably because of the old vines. This wine is a good example of the vineyard and well priced. Coche-Bizouard is a solid producer that is worth seeking out.

 
 
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Domaine Comte Georges de Vogue is the largest owner in the grand cru Musigny, perhaps the greatest vineyard in Burgundy. Vogue owns 7.12 ha. in Musginy (10.86 ha.), including the entire portion named Les Petits Musigny (4.19 ha.). The Vogue Chambolle-Musigny 1er cru is made from young vines in Musigny and the 1997 is outstanding. Revealing little aromatically at first, the wine opened after about an hour and showed some mature aromas. The wine is silky and rich on the palate. This is the first wine I have tasted from this historic domaine and it is an impressive effort from an average vintage. The wine certainly shows some Musigny character and, considering the price of the grand cru cuvee, is a relative bargain. 

 
 
I usually do not get excited by a wine from one of Burgundy’s negociants, who produce thousands of cases spanning dozens of appellations. Often, I find the wines to lack personality. However, I was recently impressed with a 2002 Beaune 1er cru Chouacheux from Louis Jadot. The wine is a textbook Beaune, soft, lush, and fragrant. While still young and primary, the wine is approachable. Beaune wines are often underrated, but they can be excellent values. This bottle is one of the more enjoyable wines I have tasted from this appellation and it inspires me to checkout future vintages.
 
 
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I was inspired by a thread on the Robert Parker board to pick-up a 1997 Bourgogne blanc bottled by Remoissenet called “Royals Club.” The thread focused on a magnum of the wine from the 1992 vintage. The gentleman who started the thread purchased the wine at a Wegman’s grocery store in upstate NY. The gentleman said that he was told the wine was actually a declassified Montrachet. It does not make sense that a wine made from grapes in the most famous vineyard would be labeled as a Bourgogne, but I was intrigued enough by the claim to purchase the 1997. The threat of premature oxidation and the mysterious province of the wine had me doubtful about its quality, but, surprisingly, it is very good. Fresh on the nose and palate, the wine seemed to have been perfectly stored. The wine was rich on the palate and had a nice finish. I did not get the impression that the wine is a grand cru in disguise, but it was an excellent Bourgogne, especially considering its age.

 
 
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Twice in the past the week I drank a 2003 from Jacky Truchot and both were classic examples of this simple, traditional winemaker. 2003 produced many full-bodied, over ripe wines, but the two I tasted from Truchot did not show any of the negative characteristics of the year. Both the Morey-Saint-Denis Vieilles Vignes and the Morey-Saint-Denis 1er cru Clos Sorbes were tight on the nose and restrained on the palate. The rich textures hinted at the warm weather conditions of the year, but neither wine showed any roasted fruits or alcohol. Truchot made his wines using methods he learned in the ’60’s and the wines always seemed unpretentious and effortless. Unfortunately, Truchot retired after the 2005 vintage. He retained a small parcel in Morey, but his wines, and winemaking style, have essentially disappeared.